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Pupil Premium

Students who are adopted, under legal guardianship and also sons/daughters of the armed forces qualify for Pupil Premium. Any students who meet this criteria need to declare it to the Principal before the census in order for us to receive the funding, for adopted and legal guardianship, the College have to see the documents, for sons/daughters of the armed forces a letter confirming this should be enough.

Eligibility Criteria Q&A
Armed Forces

Caedmon College Whitby receives additional funding in terms of the Pupil Premium to help us in our ambition to ensure every student in our College can be successful.

All members of our staff and governors accept responsibility for all learners and are committed to meeting their pastoral, social and academic needs within the College environment.

The College is committed to ‘narrowing the gap’ for vulnerable students and the Pupil Premium will follow a vital part of that process. Each student must be able to make a contribution to the life of the College through full participation in both the academic and extracurricular lives of the College.

Pupil premium strategy statement (secondary)

1.    Summary information
School  Caedmon College Whitby
Academic Year  2017/2018 Total PP budget  £177,319.00 Date of most recent PP Review  Jan 2018
Total number of students Y11 = 178

Y10 = 132

Y9 = 124

Y8 = 100

Y7 = 116

Number of students eligible for PP Y11 = 39

Y10 = 37

Y9 = 34

Y8 = 35

Y7 = 32

Date for next internal review of this strategy  April 2018

 

2. Current Attainment
Students eligible for PP (your school)

2016/2017

Students not eligible for PP (national average)
% 4+ in both English and Maths  36% 71%
% 5+ in both English and Maths 13% 49%
Progress 8 score average -0.85 +0.11
Attainment 8 score average 31.7 49.8
Ebacc 9-5  3% (5% eligible) 25%
Progress 8 English  -0.74 0.11
Progress 8 Maths -0.71 0.11
Progress 8 Ebacc -0.98 0.13
Progress 8 Open -0.86 0.09
3.  Barriers to future attainment (for students eligible for PP)
In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor literacy skills)
A. The need to improve quality first teaching and expectations for all.
B.  Inconsistent quality of feedback and opportunity to practice, literacy
C. Low self-esteem and confidence
D. Student and parent engagement.
E. Low aspiration as highlighted in opportunity area research for future progression
External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)
F.  Attendance rates for students eligible for PP are 90%, This reduces their school hours and causes them to fall behind on average
G. Local environment (seasonal and illegal youth employment)
4.  Desired outcomes (desired outcomes and how they will be measured) Success criteria
A.      Improved rates of progress for PP students across KS3 and KS4. Quality first teaching for all disadvantaged students.

 

Expectations for all PP students are high – curriculum choices extend PP students and reflect the school’s high expectations for them.

The difference between PP student attainment and non-PP attainment is significantly reduced.

 

Curriculum accessed by all, allowing students to succeed and become more independent learners. PP students have access to the highest expectations from staff.

B.      Improved quality of feedback for PP students

 

High levels of progress in literacy for Year 7 students eligible for PP.

 All PP students receive quality feedback which encourages lots of repetitive practice in their areas of weakness.

Studentss eligible for PP in Year 7 make more progress by the end of the year than their peers so that at least 50% exceed progress targets and 100% meet expected targets. This will be evidenced using data monitoring. The Catch-up programme in Y7 ensures rapid progress of those below age related expectations on entry.

C.       Behaviour for learning issues addressed at KS3 and students more actively engaged in their learning at KS4. Fewer behaviour incidents recorded on eportal for these students. Reduced exclusions. Students demonstrate resilience are open to new learning. Less passivity in learning – increased agency in learning.
D. Improved links with PP parents and increased attendance at parents’ evenings and parental forums. The number of parental contacts with PP student parents is increased in frequency and coordinated (by coach, subject teachers and ST link). The number of PP parents attending parent consultation increases. PP parents’ feedback shows that they feel supported and confident in attending school events.
E. Improved aspiration: Recognise the value of education, to create a more secure future

Access to post-16 and further education. Low levels of NEET students.

Reduced level of illegal employment amongst young people.

Reduced level of employment amongst young people.

Increased opportunities to visit and access future training and employment opportunities.

F. Increased attendance rates for students eligible for PP. The number of persistent absentees is reduced among students eligible for PP to 10% or below. Overall attendance for students eligible for PP improves from 90% to 95% in line with non-PP students.

 

5.  Planned expenditure
Academic year 2017/2018
The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the Pupil Premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.
    i.   Quality of teaching for all
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? Specific actions How will you ensure it is implemented well? Success Criteria Staff lead When will you review implementation?
 A) The need to improve quality first teaching Through the SAIL curriculum

 

Metacognition is a low cost highly effective strategy to establish with all student to improve educational outcomes (EEF, 2016, Sutton Trust, 2011, Trickey and Topping, 2007, Hattie, 2009). Implementation of SAIL Curriculum, which focuses on developing ownership of learning and development of strategies for learning.

This is lined to clear learning strategies and  attainable differentiated success factors

Monitored: Self-evaluation – HoD, SENCO feedback, Individual colleagues identified, specific feedback, actions, revisited to evidence progress, review for further action(s) Part of ST link conversation, recorded. Updates shared at ST and in the Headteacher’s report.
  • coaching in place
  • curriculum accessed through Realsmart
  • a range of workshops, seminars, lectures and masterclasses
  • learning strategies evidenced in Logbooks.

 

 

SJG
ALH

CPD follows monitoring of impact triangulated through observations, work scrutinies and student voice.

Annual Peer Reviews.

Termly self-reviews.

A) The need to improve quality first teaching. Establish a rigorous programme of monitoring for quality first teaching. The self-evaluation process is rigorous involving Governors, ST, HoDs, teaching staff, TAs, students and parents. CPD (carried out and evaluated) feedback from self-evaluation(s), structure of meetings across the school which maintain focus on the need to improve quality first teaching.

 

Development of collaboration and wider partnerships.

Monitored: Principal and Governing Body. This will be a focus of ST link meetings. There is rigorous monitoring of teaching and learning using learning walks. Specific targets are set and reviewed with staff to monitor and ensure progress. There is CPD for ST and Middle leaders to ensure that feedback fits the GROW model. Regular work scrutiny is conducted which focuses on the quality of written feedback and response for disadvantaged students over time. Disadvantaged learning progress is tracked across subjects over time to monitor progress. Disadvantaged student voice is sought regularly and followed up. Coaching of disadvantaged students is established. ST Links

Monitoring, Evaluation and Action Calendar is established and implemented.

System to ensure detailed analysis by subject teachers after every data capture with identified actions established.

 

B) Improved quality of feedback for PP students. Improved written and verbal feedback to develop higher order thinking and agency. It is a right of all (disadvantaged) students to receive high quality feedback to ensure they make progress. There is already an awareness of effective dialogic feedback, both written and verbal in school. EEF cites feedback as one of the most cost effective means of raising student attainment. We need to build on the work we have already done to ensure every disadvantaged student makes excellent progress having received the best feedback to facilitate maximum progress Provide specific feedback in line with departmental policy that enables the learner to improve. Marking is diagnostic; specific and targeted feedback and questions; oral feedback; student responses Intervention with Identified colleagues Monitor and liaise to ensure effective support –through coaching. Disadvantaged/SEN book scrutiny/learning walk focus. Monitored: Self-evaluation – HoDs, evidence collated in trackers. ST work scrutiny specific feedback, actions, revisited to evidence progress, review for further action(s). Part of ST link conversation, recorded in minutes. Updates shared at ST. Monitoring processes illustrate that: There is a clear link between written/verbal feedback and learning success criteria. Feedback from the teacher and peers is specific, kind and helpful. There is evidence of student response. Feedback is regular, differentiated and focused on specific skills to move learning on. Literacy and numeracy errors are indicated and responded to. Marking is used as a diagnostic tool to identify gaps. Feedback supports redrafting and improvements in accuracy and quality of extended writing. Encouragement of effort is linked to success factors. ST Links
HODs
Departmental Policy is adhered to by all staff. Review department Policy (June 2018); work scrutiny. Work scrutiny to involve staff in dialogue reviewing own books Evaluate impact involves ref. to success criteria, identify good practice/next steps. Peer review (May 2018).
C) Behaviour for learning issues addressed and students are more actively engaged in their learning. The language of learning and social interaction encourages agency and resilience and ensures progress. Disadvantaged students need to have access to positive language models and higher order thinking to develop their own thinking, vocabulary, cultural identity and language use. The wider College, community and staff, in particular, can model positive language use for students and praise effort. British values can be developed as part of this process. Compass Buzz tool for learning. Effective CPD from Compass Buzz and developing attitudes to learning. Intervention and support for identified colleagues Monitor using regular learning walks. A language for learning is agreed and implemented.

Implemented through the SAIL curriculum.

Monitored: self-evaluation – HoDs, evidence collated on trackers, specific feedback, actions, revisited to evidence progress, review for further action(s). Part of ST link conversation, recorded. Updates shared at ST. SAIL structure and language are being used consistently to develop agency. SJG
HJK
Behaviour for learning issues addressed at KS3 and students more actively engaged in their learning at KS4. Behaviour for learning issues addressed at KS3 and KS4. The school’s ethos and culture for learning is reflected in the PP students’ enjoyment of and independence in learning. There are positive relationships, based on effective behaviour management.

Coaching conversations are held presently with all Key Stage 3 students.

Implementation of successful futures scheme to raise expectations for all students particularly disadvantaged/ SEND. Develop systems that equip all staff with the information to set high standards for behaviour for learning. Identify and respond to staff who require additional support. Set very clear expectations. Positive reinforcement. ST to ensure all stakeholders are consulted and involved in the implementation. Students feel supported and safe. Staff and students greet each other and smile. Students can articulate their thinking and feel secure enough to request help. Staff know their students, their interests and the barriers to learning which need to be overcome. All students on the vulnerable learner list have individual learning plans (including LAC students). Vulnerable Learner toolkit with additional behaviour strategies added. Use of praise and positive language to create a positive ethos. Learning conversations are part of everyday interaction. PP students have access to enrichment activities. (A trip/theatre visit; a club or team; an activity involving a physical or emotional challenge; a contribution to supporting a charity; a project based learning experience with a real audience for their learning as the outcome; an experience with business, university or the workplace of some sort.) All students feel part of the school community. Disadvantaged students have opportunities to volunteer and are represented on student voice meetings. They represent school in extra-curricular activities. All students have a voice and feel listened to: they have access to coaching. All PP students have a coach (IGROW model of mentoring). The coach is central to the PP students’ experience. ALH
SJG
JJB
June 2018
Expectations for all PP students are high. Ensure all TA and mentor time is used effectively. The effective use of TAs and mentors is a key school priority. TAs should not be used as a substitute for teachers with PP students; they should add value to what the teacher does (Rowland, 2015). Improve liaison between teachers and TAs. ST links to receive updates from HJK concerning classroom practice. Monitored: self-evaluation – HoDs, specific feedback, actions, revisited to evidence progress, review for further action(s). Part of ST link conversation, recorded. Updates shared at ST. Liaison: TAs and teachers liaise with each other. Interventions outside the classroom inform practice. Evidence-based interventions are used by trained TAs in one to one and small group sessions – eg, Lexia. TAs are aware of the routines and protocols of the classroom. They understand how to encourage students to be more independent and to develop their metacognitive thinking. TAs have and understand their role in developing independent study skills which help students to understand their own learning and metacognitive thinking with PP students. HJK/ KVM June 2018
High levels of progress in literacy and numeracy for Year 7 students eligible for PP. Improved levels of literacy and numeracy. Research shows that using subject specific language accurately improves outcomes. Disadvantaged students start education with a Literacy deficit. A high percentage of PP students have speech and language deficits.

Baseline testing using GL. Assessment including dyslexia and dyscalculia. This is done twice a year.

Literacy: targeted intervention with KS3 early intervention for all Year 7 PP students as part of Catch Up programme based on through baseline testing. Use Lexia to address literacy deficits. Establish intervention at class and small group level for those who need it. Further develop literacy homework tasks. Review the results from Lexia testing. See Literacy Action plan. Literacy lead MXC. Lexia Tests. Students more actively engaged in their learning evidenced by a range of indicators (attendance, behaviour, progress.) STe June 2018
(E) Improved aspiration. Through an integrated CIAG and personal development policy. Gatesby Benchmarks: Through a co-ordinated careers programme that creates bespoke opportunities for students. Working with the Careers Enterprise Company (Opportunity Area), Flying Futures Project (Specifically focussing on students from the Streonshalh Ward) and NYBEP create a differentiated and structured programme engaging students, parents and staff Using the Gatesby Benchmarks and action planning toolkit.

Careers Standard Kitemark

Student and Parent voice.

  • students having a minimum of 6 positive encounters with employers
  • students clearly able to articulate the value of staying in long term education or training
  • reduction of illegal working practices.
SJG July 2018
Total budgeted cost
   ii.   External Barriers
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? Specific Actions How will you ensure it is implemented well? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
Parental involvement of PP students. Improved links with PP parents and increased attendance at parents’ evenings and parental forums. Improved engagement with the parents of PP pupils will help in our understanding of barriers to learning and how these can be removed. Direct contact made with each parent.

Home visits.

Parental feedback. Contact with parents of PP students is made in a variety of ways (text, letter, phone calls, face to face, Facebook etc.) Parents feel it is relevant/have a vested interest in attending school parents’ evenings and parental forums – these are targeted and relevant to PP parents. HJK and

RAG

 May 2018
Increased attendance rates for students eligible for PP. First day response provision ongoing.

 

Join up work with safeguarding team weekly meetings through VNi’s attendance at each meeting.

It isn’t possible to improve attainment for students if they aren’t attending school. NfER briefing for school leaders identifies addressing attendance as a key step.

 

To review individual cases and impact of key worker.

Regular liaison meetings with other agencies. Ensure rigour of fast track prosecutions. Develop individual plans for PA students. Particular focus on those who are ‘just below’ threshold.

 

All PA names added to weekly safeguarding list.

Weekly monitoring of attendance data VNi/JJB. JJB and attendance manager have a thorough knowledge of existing absence issues. JJB/ VNi May 2018
Total budgeted cost
 iii.    Other approaches – Y11 Intervention
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? Specific Actions How will you ensure it is implemented well? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
PP students make at least expected progress. English/Maths intervention.

 

Holiday Revision School

 

 

 

iCollege for 1-1 support

Individual revision timetable organised with each student via coach and iCollege support.

 

 

 

 

 

Personalised support

Removing challenge

Students provided with specific action plan/revision materials/subject staff support. Additional sessions for English/Maths intervention. Exam technique/Study skills workshops for PP students.  ST monitoring.

PP students have access to all revision materials/a place to revise.

PP students are equipped with subject specific/exam language/techniques to improve outcomes. Most PP students attend additional sessions focused on exam preparation.

 RAG Sept  2018
Total budgeted cost  

 

6.  Review of expenditure – £169,449.25
Previous Academic Year 2016/2017
    i.   Quality of teaching for all
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach Estimated impact: did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on students not eligible for PP, if appropriate. Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost
Improve progress across the curriculum. Learning mentors X15 to support individuals in lessons.

iCollege support

 

P4P continued to ensure all teachers are differentiating using data informed planning. This is linked to PM process.

Over the academic year most students improved in one of the four factors used to measure progress in school.

 

Impact seen in T+L tracker entries for individual staff and departments.

The use of learning mentors was reviewed September and redesigned to ensure impact is evident in September 2018 results.

 

Review impact of CPD and continue focus with ST Links/ HODs.

 £118,495.34
   ii.   Targeted support
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on students not eligible for PP, if appropriate. Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost
Ensuring access to full curriculum.

Purchase of revision guides.

Providing specific revision and open learning sessions during the holidays.

Extra curriculum support.

Purchase of ICT equipment.

Revision sessions well attended in holidays, average of 50 students per session receiving specific subject guidance. ICT enabled access to a suite of revision resources. Students in iCollege received extra curriculum support, which enabled them to complete the courses they began. Must be used as part of ongoing revision plan and checked with teachers.

 

Evaluate impact annually with target focus groups and data.

 £23,885.00
Improved attendance Raising attainment officer to ensure all needs were met, barriers to education were reduced. Case studies were in place and used for the discounting of students  Post deleted due to minimal impact  £12,000.00
 iii.    Other approaches
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach Estimated impact: did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on students not eligible for PP, if appropriate. Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost
SEMH Support Counselling LSA with a local provider. Increase resilience and support with pre exam anxiety. Explore other means of support eg, Compass Buzz, healthy schools team and coaches.  £15,000.00